Poldark, Series Two So Far

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Series two of Poldark is finally here, well it is if you’re British or have access to BBC One channel, if not you’ll have to wait until the 25th of September for it to appear in North America. If you’re anything like me (i.e. fell down the rabbit’s hole that is Poldark) then you’ve been awaiting its arrival in oscillating states of utter excitement and sheer terror. Will series two live up to the majesty that was series one? Will our hearts’ break like they did at the end of series one? Will we fall even more in love with Ross and Demelza and their relationship? Will we want to burn down all the Warleggans? (The question is rhetorical because the answer will always be yes.) Will we see more of Demelza and Verity’s friendship? Will we see the demise of others? Will we see new ones strike up? Will we be continually stunned by the panoramic vistas of the Cornish Coast? All will soon be answered. (Thank god!)

As the old saying goes, ‘you can never judge a book by its cover’, and you can never really judge a series just on its first episode, but what an opening episode for Poldark’s second series. It does an incredible job of picking up where the first series left off and moving us onto the journey that it will take us on in this series. The loss of Julia is still recent and raw in the hearts and minds of Ross and Demelza. Ross’s trial for the pillaging the wreck draws on and ventures even into more dangerous waters as Ross buries his head in the sand. Demelza is as fierce, pure-hearted, loyal, brilliant, and oh so queen like than ever before. Wheal Leisure continues to under deliver on copper but totally delivered when it came to shirtless Ross! (YAS!) The rift between Francis and Elizabeth continues to widen and deepen, as Elizabeth turns to George for help and Francis finally has some sense knocked into him. And good old, Aunt Agatha is ever so observant and sharp-tongued.

The opening episode of the Poldark really packed quite a lot into 60 minutes but it never felt rushed or over packed. Each scene took its time and played itself out beautifully for us to gaze in wonder and delight and tense in fear at certain moments. From the intimate moments between Ross and Demelza to the friendships we see between Demelza and Verity and Ross and Dwight, to the sparks between Dwight and Caroline, to the confrontation between Ross and George, and to the increasingly tense and distraught relationship between Francis and Elizabeth, each scene delivered. Even the emergence of new characters like Caroline Penvenen, her dog Horace, her Uncle and her possible suitor and MP, felt natural. No scene was out of place. No moment was overwrought. Everything worked together seamlessly to create an amazing first episode to the series.

The acting continues to be absolutely sublime in this series, with Eleanor Tomlinson and Kyle Soller stepping up to bat and really knocking it out of the park this episode. The incredible chemistry between Ross and Demelza (Aidan Turner and Eleanor Tomlinson) continues to envelop and fire up any scene the two of them are in together. The panoramic shots of the Cornish Coast continue to stun and are propelled forward by the amazing score created by Anne Dudley. Debbie Horsfield has written and incredible first episode and kind of made the long, arduous wait for the second series worth it.

Poldark has set the stage for its second series. It has a lot to live up to but if the first episode of the series is any indication, we will once again have our socks blown off once more. Plus we have 10 episodes to look forward to this series and a third series and some of the best acting coming of the United Kingdom today. Happy Poldarking!

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